Friday, September 21, 2018

Weekly RunDown #106

“Leave no stone unturned in your endeavours to be the best you can be.”
Ron Hill


An interview with Ron Hill, where I got the quote from

Gary Cohen interview with Ron Hill

This week's Interview Tuesday was with Randy Gilbert of Leitchfield Kentucky

If you were somehow out of the loop Eliud Kipchoge did what was expected, at least I expected it, and broke the marathon world record but how fast he ran was amazing.  Also, what does it look like after a race that goes as planned and how about calling your shot then making it 

Sweat Elite put out some interesting pace notes on Kipchoge's record run:
2:01:39 Marathon Pace is equal to:
  • 100m pace: 17.3 
  • 200m pace: 34.6 
  • 400m pace: 69.1 
  • 800m pace: 2:18 
  • 1000m pace: 2:53 
  • 1500m pace: 4:19 
  • 3km Pace: 8:38 
  • 5km Pace: 14:24 
  • That is 42 x 1km reps at 2:53 without a break!

This was written on Kipchoge before Berlin - there is an argument for him being not the best marathoner ever but the best distance runner ever when you look at what he has done in the past in much shorter races

A look at Kipchoge's run and the 100 seconds needed to go under 2 hours

Toni Reavis weighs in on who is the GOAT (Greatest of all Time) in distance running

Mark Cucuzzella's new book Run for Your Life is out.  I am looking forward to reading it and will have a review of it on my blog as soon as I am done.  Here is the website Mark has set up in conjunction with his book.

Here is Mark Cucuzzella talking to Jason Fitzgerald on injury prevention on the StrengthRunnng Podcast Episode 72

Joe Gray gets 4th for Team USA at he World Mountain Running Championships

A further look at the 2018 WMRC in Canillo, Andorra

How to be a good crew/support member

Whether I would run the 100 or the 50 I would like to run the Black Hills race one day, here is a report on the 100.  I lived in Rapid City when I was in Junior High and have family connections in SD and let alone the Black Hills are beautiful!

Dirt Church Radio talks to Jeff Browning

iRunFar.coms This Week in Running: September 17, 2018

LetsRun.com's Weekly Roundup - The Week That Was

A look at Your Feet by Dr. Maffetone

If you are like me and busy and have to do what ever you can to just get in a workout some days, but getting ready for a workout is as important as the workout to make it more effective

There had been talk she would not run Chicago due to injury and I guess it was so: Hasay will nor run Chicago

If you want to run a race in the Philippines then check out Vertical To Sky (V2S) Mountain Race Event Management

Looks like a beautiful place to run: Vietnam Mountain Marathon with races from 10K to 100K running this weekend.



Local, to Kentucky, Races and Events
(If you have a race in the area, including surrounding states, let me know and I will post about it)

Check out these Race Companies for local races: Good Times Even Services & Central Kentucky Race Management.  For trail and Ultra races in Kentucky and Virginia check out Next Opportunity Events

The Rugged Red Half Marathon in the beautiful Red River Gorge KY looks still have spots open for next week's race on September 29th.  It is a tough yet beautiful race.

If you want to ride a Century then check out the Century, and shorter rides, in Campbellsville, KY on October 6th put on by The Spoke Easy in C'ville.  Register here

Need a trail race at the beginning of November then maybe the Jefferson Memorial Forest Trail Hillbilly Half in Louisville KY is for you on November 3rd, 2018.  I have only run out in the area once but there are some great trails

The Second Annual Harrods Creek Trail Bash 5K/10K is November 18, 2018 in Prospect KY

Also, check out the inaugural Falls 100 - also has a Half-Marathon, Marathon and 50 miler as well as the 100.

Want to run a great race then put the 2019 Yamacraw 50k (also a 20K and 10K ) on your schedule.  The race is April 6, 2019 and registration opens October 1st, 2018.  Either set your own reminder or have Ultrasignup send you one as I would not be surprised if this race does not sell out real fast as word is getting out about it.


Masters News
Charles Allie is USATF Athlete of the Week for his M70 world 400M World Record of 57.26 in Malaga
Great Britain tops the medal table at Malaga


Races this Coming Week
Vietnam Mountain Marathon Races (100k, 70K, Marathon, 1/2 Marathon, 15K & 10K), Sapa, Vietnam - September 21-23, 2018
North Coast 24-Hour Endurance Run (USATF 24-Hour National Championships ), Cleveland, OH - September 22, 2018
Cotswold Way Century, Chipping Campden, UK - September 22, 2018
Flagstaff to Grand Canyon Stagecoach Line 100 Mile, Flagstaff, AZ - September 22, 2018
The Piney Woods Ultra, Tyler, TX - September 22, 2018
The Georgia Jewel, Dalton, GA - September 22, 2018


Past Weekend Race Results
Run Rabbit Run 100 & 50 Mile, Steamboat Springs, CO - September 14 & 15, 2018
Barkley Fall Classic, Frozen Head State Park, TN - September 15, 2018
Light the Night 5K, Elizabethtown, KY - September 15, 2018
Mogollon Monster 100,  Pine, AZ - September 15, 2018
Ring of Steall Sky Race, Kinlochleven, Scotland - September 15, 2018
Berlin Marathon, Berlin, Germany - September 16, 2018
Glen Coe Skyline 52K, Kinlochleven, Scotland - September 16, 2018
World Mountain Running Championships, Canillo, Andorra - September 16, 2018


Kipchoge's Record Run


In case you did not know how fast Kipchoge has been - here he wins the 2003 World Championship 5K in 12:52.79 - by the way beating two of the best


Highlights from the Glen Coe Skyline race


Trail Running in China


2018 World Mountain Running Championships - Canillo, Andorra


Often see the highlights from the 2018 UTMB but what about the TDS Race (121K)


The latest Mountain Outhouse News











Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Interview Tuesday: Kentucky and Masters Runner Randy Gilbert

First 1/2 Marathon
This week I talk to Randy Gilbert.  I have not talked to him much in person as we just met at a race recently as he moved into my age group (50-59), thankfully I move out next year:)  Enjoy getting to know another of Kentucky's runners/cyclists.


Tell us a little about yourself not necessarily related to running: age, where born, education, area you live in, etc…..
My name is Randy Gilbert, I was born in Chicago, IL . and grew up outside of Leitchfield, KY.  I went to Clarkson Elementary and Grayson Co Middle and High School


What is your profession?
I am employed at Metalsa Structures Corporation as a robot tech and have been employed at Metalsa since January 1996.  We manufacture frames for the ford F-150 and Expedition/Navigator.


How did you start running and what prompted you to do so? 
I started cycling after my mother had a stroke in 2007.  I had always lifted weights and  I always considered myself' in shape"- I wasn't - just because you're strong doesn't mean you're healthy.  My mom was strong too.  So I decided I needed a lifestyle change.  I always worried about burning calories but in the sense of losing weight to the effect of losing strength.  So I really had to reset my brain.  I started cycling and I've always enjoyed bicycles.  I started riding and it made me feel young again.  The I started to notice a trend that as winter come along I wasn't riding as much and then when spring came I felt id lost all my gains.  So i bought a treadmill and started running to improve my cycling and grew to enjoy the running and its grown since then.


How long have you been running? 
Probably consistently somewhere about 6 years..


Did you participate in any other sports over the years?
No not really, I just cycle and run and lift weights


Did you run in grade school, High School or College? 
No, I never ran in school.


So we get an idea of where you have been with running can you share your PR’s for: 5K, 10K marathon and any other distance you may have run in the past. 

  • 5k PR is 20 flat - the 1 second into 19s is probably going to haunt me
  • 10k is 42:13 at monster dash in Bowling Green
  • Half Marathon  is 1:34:59... I believe thats my fastest to date...

What is your most memorable race or races and share a little about at least one of them?
I'd say my most memorable is my first century ride, mainly because of all the nervousness that went along with it. I'd never done anything like that.  My most memorable run has to be my first 5k which happened to be in Bowling Green at Keriekes Park..The Monster Dash.  It was in the dark on wet grass and an off camber first quarter mile -  was really nervous!! Also, there is my first obstacle course race, a Tough Mudder in Maysville.  I'd been training for that race for 6 months then we arrive and its 41 degrees and the first obstacle is a dumpster full of ice water and then by mile 3 it had started drizzling mixed with snow....freezing and getting zapped with electricity crawling thru muddy water!! good times!!


Do you have a favorite workout you do?
I'd guess my favorite workouts are really any that really tax me... like a longer hilly run or ride...


How about a favorite route you like to run?
My favorite route for running is really any route with rolling hills.  Right now I have a 4 mile loop from the gym that I really love doing.


What is your favorite distance to run and race? 
I don't know that I have a favorite.  I really like the 5k because its an all out short burst but I also like the half for its strategy in pacing to complete with a pace that you are happy with and I feel that I gave my all.


What shoes do you run in and what do you like about them?
I wear Brooks Raveenas, I just love this shoe.  I suffer from Mortons Neuroma and the toe box on these shoes coupled with the stability and comfort for me is exceptional.  I've tried other shoes but always return to the Raveenas.


What does your diet consist of when in training and when not?
I really don't diet much.  I try to stay away from fast foods and cakes and pies but other than that I really don't diet.  I like carbs and I do drink protein shakes after any hard effort workout.


I know you ride a fair amount, how did you start riding and how does it play a part in your training?
I think in my opinion running and riding play hand in hand, they compliment each other for me anyway.  I've come to realize that cadence is very important and running has sped my cycling cadence up and  that has naturally sped my run cadence.  I try to average 169 running and 95 cycling.


Which do you enjoy more: Riding or Running?   And Why?
I don't know that I enjoy one more than the other.  I love to ride in the summer because you can cover a lot of area faster but in the cooler temp days I really love to run.  So to pick a favorite would be hard for me.


Are there any other sports you take part in?
I really enjoy weight training and kayaking as well as obstacle course races.


Do you have any long-range plans?
First Race getting an Age Group Award (2nd from right)

My long range plan is simple - stay in motion as long as I can and to avoid injury.  I'd like to do a full marathon in the future but I don't have one picked out yet, been studying on a couple.


What do you like best about living and running in KY?
Kentucky is beautiful and people are friendly.  I love the rural areas the most,  keeps traffic low and is usually safer.  The national parks we have in the state are just flat beautiful. I truly believe God smiled when he created Kentucky.


What do you struggle with most with regards to running and training in general?
Injury - I have no issues with stamina or cramping or fueling, usually.  My biggest fear is injury. probably the reason for not having done a full yet is fear of a hurt knee.  My knees are huge concern for me.  I really protect them the best I can because they are the key to my fitness as well as my mobility.  I've had a knee scare once and it sits on my mind a lot.  I feel really blessed that God has allowed me to do the things I love with minimal injury.


What do you see as a trend in running?
I do see more and more people running as a way for gettin"in shape."  For the most part its free, other than quality shoes running is free - no gym memberships required - no bicycles -just a pair of shoes. so why not run? or even walk?


If you had one, well maybe two or three, things to say those that are running to encourage them what would it be?
Hmm really my best advice would be to get out and enjoy the outdoors.  Run or ride., hike or walk or whatever.  Get outside, don't worry about speed or distances, if thats a priority it will come on its own.  Sure you can do things to improve those and you can but the first step is to go.  I think we as a people in todays fast paced life are growing more and more unhealthy.  Whether its the food we intake or the ease in which technology has helped us to do things or even our busy lives wearing us down to where we feel we are"too tired" or "I don"t have time."  Truth is we have time., it doesn't take  2 or 3 hours a day.  An average runner is able to run 3.1 miles in 30 minutes.  There's lots of excuses to not exercise, but our health is diminishing from these excuses.  I believe the first step is the hardest.  I struggle every single morning - I want to reset the clock and go back to sleep.  I try to argue its too windy, it may rain, it's too something or another.  But every single time I defeat that thought and bring it into subjection and go run or ride or whatever I always feel good about it when I finish and I'd suspect most people would be the same way.


Do you have a website or other social media site you would like to share?
No not really.  I follow Running Soles and Central Kentucky Wheelmen for events and group activities.  They are both awesome, Will Rivera does an amazing job for the running community here in Central KY.


Any closing comments?
My advice to runners, or cyclists ,or really any exercising, would be to keep it as fun and enjoyable as you can.  You will be more likely to stick with something if you aren't dreading it.  Sure you will be sore from time to time but most muscle soreness is very temporary. keep it fun and have fun!!




Friday, September 14, 2018

Weekly RunDown #105

Bob Schul winning the 1964 Olympic 5000m
"You train to get your body in shape to do the things you want it to do. As you live your life you have many things that happen to you, some good and some bad, but they all teach you something. "
Bob Schul

Gary Cohen interview of Bob Schul from 2010 - where the above quote came from

A good series on Bob Schul 1964 Olympic 5000m Champion - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 & On Being Greatful

I did not have an Interview Tuesday this week but did put out a list of the interviews done to date

While no one wants injuries there is good to find in them, as I shared in this post - Injuries: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

As far as injuries go and along the same lines as my article Andrew Botchart a Scottish runner talks about keeping positive after needing to take time after breaking a bone in his foot

iRunFar.com's This Week in Running: September 10, 2018

The importance of  the ankles in your running

Insights gleaned form watching the UTMB from someone who had not really watch ultras before

Speaking of needing strong ankles the 5th race in the Golden Trail series is the Ring of Steall Sky Race this Saturday in Kinlochlevebn Scotland

Berlin is this Sunday and for me at least is a reason to stay up late Saturday or early Sunday for those on the east coast - Women's Preview and a a look at the men's race, well mainly Eliud Kipchoge.  Sure hoping Kipsang is ready and Eliud and he make a race of it and break the record

Wow, 17 sub 60 minute 1/2 marathoners are running the Copenhagen Half-Marathon this weekend

Gary Cantrell, aka Lazarus Lake, finishes his Trans Con in 126 days-11 Hours-14 Minutes and 57 seconds - quite the trip.

Speaking of Laz, he will now have to hop over to TN to be at the Barkley Classic which is this weekend - here is one persons review of the race after they ran it

It's a start and hope it extends to the main Olympics soon - as Cross-Country will be added to the 2018 Youth Olympics

Sad to hear that 1998 World Half-Marathon Champion Paul Koech passed away at 49.  I remember watching him run many a race.

A look at three reasons athletes get injured

A list of 10 of the World's Wildest Ultra's . what do you think?

Interesting look at the "The Last Day Run" and it's history and impact on Ultrarunning in the US

What do you think of Back-to-Back Long runs, here are some pro's and con's.  This is a hard one as I used to do them when a lot younger and I think they really helped but I also got injured more often so that probably out weighed the good side.  All that said you can be competitive without them as I have seen Camille Herron speak of not doing extreme long runs or Back-to-Back's and I would say she is successful.

A look at the US team for this weeks World Mountain Running Championships in Andorra

Need a new challenge then how about "Utahs Toughest Triathlon."

A key building anything, including your fitness and training plan, is to have a good foundation


Keep an eye on the Weekly RunDown the week before the 2018 Kona Ironman, October 5th, as I will be having a giveaway of a bag of the SFuels drink in honor of SFuels triathlete Dan Plews who is doing the race.  If you are interested in learning more about switching fuels here is a Quick Start Guide



Local, to Kentucky, Races and Events
(If you have a race in the area, including surrounding states, let me know and I will post about it)

Check out these Race Companies for local races: Good Times Even Services & Central Kentucky Race Management.  For trail and Ultra races in Kentucky and Virginia check out Next Opportunity Events

Want a night race then run the Light the Night 5K in Elizabethtown, KY on September 15th

More info to follow for those runners who ride as there will be a Century, and shorter rides in Campbellsville, KY on October 6th put on The Spoke Easy in C'ville.

Need a trail race at the beginning of November then maybe the Jefferson Memorial Forest Trail Hillbilly Half in Louisville KY is for you on November 3rd, 2018.  I have only run out in the area once but there are some great trails

The Second Annual Harrods Creek Trail Bash 5K/10K is November 18, 2018 in Prospect KY

Also, check out the inaugural Falls 100 - also has a Half-Marathon, Marathon and 50 miler as well as the 100.

Want to run a great race then put the 2019 Yamacraw 50k (also a 20K and 10K ) on your schedule.  The race is April 6, 2019 and registration opens October 1st, 2018.  Either set your own reminder or have Ultrasignup send you one as I would not be surprised if this race does not sell out real fast as word is getting out about it.


Masters News
Start Lists and Results from the World Masters Championships in Malaga Spain


Races this Coming Week
Run Rabbit Run 100 & 50 Mile, Steamboat Springs, CO - September 14 & 15, 2018
Barkley Fall Classic, Frozen Head State Park, TN - September 15, 2018
Light the Night 5K, Elizabethtown, KY - September 15, 2018
Mogollon Monster 100,  Pine, AZ - September 15, 2018
Ring of Steall Sky Race, Kinlochleven, Scotland - September 15, 2018
Berlin Marathon, Berlin, Germany - September 16, 2018
Glen Coe Skyline 52K, Kinlochleven, Scotland - September 16, 2018
World Mountain Running Championships, Canillo, Andorra - September 16, 2018


Past Weekend Race Results
Ultra Tour Monte Rosa, Monte Rosa, IT - September 5-8, 2018
Tahoe 200, Homewood, CA - September 7-9, 2018
Wasatch Front 100, East Layton, UT - September 7, 2018
Ultra-Trail Harricana, La Malbaie, Quebec - September 7-9, 2018
Breaks 40 Miler, Breaks Interstate Park, KY & VA - September 8, 2018
IAU 100k World Championships, Zagreb, Croatia - September 8, 2018
Iron Horse 5K, New Haven, KY - September 8, 2018
The Hawk 50 and 100, Lawrence, KS - September 8, 2018
Lake Cumberland Half-Marathon, Bronston, KY - September 8, 2018
Great North Run (1/2 Marathon), Newcastle, UK - September 9, 2018


1964 Olympic 5000m Finish with Bob Schul Winning


Highlights The Rut 28K - 2018


A look at Snow Lake - Snoqualmie Pass, WA


Mtn. Outhouse News


The Ring of Steall race is this weekend


A look at last years Glen Coe race which is a day later

















Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Injuries: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

Injuries, that dreaded word – a word we don’t want to hear.  It is easy to see the bad and ugly with injuries but how do we see the good.  The bad is obvious in that when we get injured we do not get to do what we want to do; run, ride, swim or some other activity.  The ugly is that injuries are painful and disruptive in more than our running or other athletic activities but also often affect other areas of life, yes there areas other than athletics.  Since we can pretty much all find the bad and ugly with injuries I am going to look at the good side of them since as far as what is good that is often much more difficult to discern.  However, there is good to be found in injuries, we just have to find it.  If we do not find the good there is a “good” possibility that more injuries and disruptions are to come.  So as to work towards seeing the good in this latest injury here is some background on my current injury.

Those of you that know me know I have been dealing with what seems to be Plantar Fasciitis, I say "seems like" since it may be more than just PF, for the past year, but for others here is a little history.  Last June (2017) I was doing a harder tempo run and with 4 miles to go my calf cramped and I ran slowly home, in hindsight I should have walked – but my mind did not want to walk 4 miles – mistake in looking back.  This led to the back of my heel being sore and feeling it in the Achilles some.  With the Hood to Coast Relay coming up in August (2017) I took a couple weeks off to let the heel calm down.  During this time I did some stretching but was careful not wanting to aggravate the Achilles and it got reasonably better but not fully.  When I started running again I continued stretching and working my calves being careful to keep things easy so that I could run the relay in a little over a month.  While not entirely healed my foot did feel better so I ran the Hood to Coast Relay and looking back that may have not ben the best decision but at the time the lure of doing a race such as Hood to Coast and being able to handle the soreness I went for it.    If you have ever run a relay like Hood to Coast, or The Bourbon Chase, you know you run hard then jump in a van to get to the next exchange zone.  If you are the last person in a van, #6 or #12, you might get some time to cool but not anyone else because it is pretty much also race to get to the next exchange area.  What I expect happened is my tight calves just rebelled no matter how much I rolled and stretch in the van but being seated in the van they just tightened up.  So after the race things were pretty sore.

From that time on I have been dealing with heel issues that move around from the bottom to the side of my heel.  I work to stretch as much as I can and not sit too long for work, even getting a standing desk, and while I was able to get back to running, after a couple week rest, I never was fully healed but not limping or anything like that.   I did have to pass on the Land Between the Lakes 50 miler in March of 2018 due to not feeling right.  Thus I did not race and ran easy so my foot was feeling somewhat better but was in truth not better.  I then ran a 10k trail race in May to get ready for the Yamacraw 50K and was hopeful things would work out even though my foot was still sore, especially on downhills – not good thing to have on trail races.  I ran Yamacraw and my foot just felt like it got beat up and downhills, where I can usually pick up time, were even more painful so did not have a great race but looking back considering my training and injury I guess it was a good run.  I again took a couple weeks off to rest my foot and got back to training and running slow so as to keep things good on my foot.

I did run a 10hr run getting 56.5 miles and my foot was sore but not too bad during the race as the course was a flat horse track so no downhill to deal with.  However once again when done the foot was sore again and as I had planned on The Back Yard Classic in August and Tunnel Hill in November I got back to easy training.  Things were sore but seemed to slowly getting better.  Then I did, looking back, a really stupid thing.  I had been out driving around doing errands all day and got home and as it was supposed to be raining for the next few days with thunderstorms I got home and rushed out and went on a hard 8 mile tempo run.  Coming down a steep hill, there is that downhill thing again, right by my house at the end of the run and my heel suddenly got very sore and from then on things have not been good.  I took another couple weeks off and came back in July to run a 10K and 5K to test my foot and while I got through the race I was limping afterwards and thus I again took time off, this time 3 weeks.  Now during this time I got back to riding my bike as it does not seem to aggravate my foot issues.  I came back to run after the three weeks as my heel had been sore but feeling better.  When I started back to running it was sore again and the soreness was not just on the run or just after but extended to the next day and was making me limp even more.  I had been riding more so after these first few easy and short runs I decided it was time to take more time off and get rid of this issue.  While maybe not the smartest things I decided, as I was in So. Cal for work, I was going to do the Mt. Baldy Run-to-the-Top trail race (7 miles and 4000ft) and then start at least 2 months off.  I am also thankful to Steve Durbin as he allowed me to take my entry for Tunnel Hill, as there was no way I could run it even if I dropped down in distance, and defer it to another race next year.

So that is where I am as it has been about a week since the Mt. Baldy run and I have started my 2-month layoff from running.  In this time I will be riding to be ready to do a Century in October then will take a month off from both riding and running as it works out to be a good time to just take a rest as even when I took my intermittent 2 week rests I was always doing something..  During this rest period I will be stretching and working to get things right functionally.  I am pretty sure my issue is not simply a foot issue as I find issues usually start further up or down the chain from where the issue shows itself.  If I get to November and the foot is still questionable I will take another month but will be back to riding after a month off from it in October.
Injury in 2016, hmm - did it start here?

I should add as I looked back I have had had issues with my right foot, the one troubling me now, foot, injury back in 2016 that I never figured out what it was but had to rest it up and with hindsight being 20/20 I can see how this may all be connected – I slap my forehead.
longer than the last year.  Initially I thought about how when I ran my first 50 miler at Land Between the Lakes in 2017 and got done my right foot felt really beat up.  I chalked it up to not enough cushioning in my shoes and a really sloppy course but looking back it may have been a precursor to
what I am experiencing now.  This soreness then reared itself at the 2017 Yamacraw where I had a good race but again had a very sore right foot.  But then I remembered how I wrote about an ankle, same

So that was a long way of saying I am fed up with taking days and weeks off here and there and avoiding the obvious need to shut it down for an extended period of time.  I tend to struggle with this mentality, as my inclination is to push through things but in truth - why.  I am not a pro or someone that makes their living off of running, and even if I did I still would need to take longer rests but it would play into things more, so should take a view that is more long term.

Also, I should add that while I don't like to not start races I enter I work to not let the fact I have paid for an entry influence if I race or not.  In accounting terms it is a “sunk cost” meaning it is paid for and the funds are gone, whether I run or not the money is spent.  What should drive our decision to race or not is not what you have spent but the cost of racing – that is the cost to your body and future running and health.   I’m thankful, as mentioned before, to race directors like Steve Durbin who has let me defer my entry on two races now.  That said even if I could not defer the entry fee, as has happened more than once, I would still pass on races that would be a detriment to my health and future running.

My decision to shut it down for at least 2 months was driven by my foot soreness but also by plans for 2019/2020.  My goal for 2019 is to qualify for Boston for 2020 when I turn 60 and my goal race to do this is the 2019 Derby Marathon in late April.  Also, as part of this I will run some shorter races to prepare for Boston and limit my longer races to 50K, which in truth seems to be the distance I like the most.  Also next year I have plans to run a R-2-R-2-R at the Grand Canyon in late September with Doug Lynch and any others that may want to join in.  As this run not a race and
I want to do this for fun and adventure it fits my schedule and will work to help build for Boston 2020.

Those that know me know that I believe that nothing happens by chance and that all things work together for good (Romans 8:28) and while I readily admit this injury is not pleasant there is good that has come out of it.  For one I have rekindled my love for cycling.  While I have been running for a long time I have also ridden for maybe 37 years, but not so much the last 10 years.  I have been able to get out and do some long rides and even raced a Time Trial and am remembering how much I loved riding.  The other good side of this is I am going to keep riding once I am back to running and work to use both activities to help each other and hopefully avoid injuries.  Way back in the 80’s I took up riding due to a knee issue and the riding solved that problem, a problem that I no longer have, and maybe that is what I needed to learn, I need riding to be better balanced in my body as riding works things differently than running.  Also, another good, and this is sort of a universal truth with most injuries I will get some concentrated rest and not just a day or week here and there.  Our bodies need rest and they will get it one way or another, usually if you are like me it is via an injury as when I am doing well it is hard to take the needed rest.  Also, even having this injury get me to write my thoughts that helped me to look back farther than just my discomfort at Land Between the Lakes in 2017 but to when I did some sort of strain to it in 2016.  All to let me see I need to not only rest my foot, stretch it and the connected areas but also to work to strengthen what may be weakened.  Thus my 2months, or more, rest will not be a matter of doing nothing but working to build up a weak area.

Ok after all that explanation and trying to help see how I have seen good in this injury I really hope there are lessons you can take from this to help you in your running, in no particular order:
  • Make sure to be honest with yourself with regards to injuries
  • Remember you are not a pro, unless you are reading this and are one, and taking time off has to be on the table
  • You can miss a race you have paid for if the result of running it may be to be detrimental to your health and future running
  • Realize that more often than not short rests when injured can be good but often they just postpone the longer break you need
  • Make sure to have down time in your training routine, when you are healthy, so as to help minimize the risk of injury
  • Realize that your body does not necessarily recognize miles but stress so if you cross train, and I recommend it, make sure not to add more simply because it is not running
  • If you have particular injuries consider taking up biking, or other activity,  to get aerobic work in with less stress on the body – if you ride just make sure your bike is set up correctly
  • While I tend to only do this after it is too late, take time to stop and look back over the last year or more and see if you can see any trends.
  • Have long term goals, they may change but having them can be important in making decisions with regards to injuries as when we think short term we, or at least I do, tend to try and just push through but this can only be done for s short time and will in the end be a detriment to long term goals.
  • I am sure there are more things and will add them as they come to mind and if you take time you may come up with others
While I am not excited about being injured and was hoping for a good year if you can learn from my troubles then I truly am thankful my injury can have a positive side to it .  Also, I will be posting later the exercises and stretches I have found that work best to deal with my PF issues but want to work through a few things first to nail down what are the best things to do.





Friday, September 7, 2018

Weekly RunDown #104

“One thing about racing is that it hurts.  You better accept that from the beginning or 
you’re not going anywhere.”
Bob Kennedy

Runner's World interview with Bob Kennedy

Check out this week's Interview Tuesday as I talk to Josh Elliot

iRunFar.com's This Week in Running: September 4, 2018

A look at Walmsley's troubles at UTMB

A look at UTMB from iRunFar who by the way had awesome live coverage as did the UTMB site who had live video

A look at the 10% rule: Fact or Fiction?

A look at the Great North Run that is this weekend: Men & Women

Orange Mud podcast on The Hawk 100, and other distances, and a call to get at least 100 finishers in the 100 miler to get it to be a WS100 qualifier

Nice article on Will Rivera who owns the Running Soles running store in Elizabethtown, KY and will be running the Spartathon (153miles) for the US September  28th

Dylan Bowman's report on 2018 TDS

I am looking forward to reading Mark Cucuzzella's new book Run for Your Life which is shipping September 18th but can be pre-ordered.  In the mean-time check out the website he has set up as there is a lot of info and resources there: Run for Your Life Website.  Once I get the book, and read it, I will be doing a review.

Men's and Women's 100K World Championship preview  and iRunFar will have live coverage

Speaking of iRunFar.com - they put out a lot of great content and live race coverage so think about being a Patreon supporter 

Another site that has great info and provides daily news in Ultrarunnerpodcast.com and you can support them as well.

A list of the Top 10 Toughest Ultras with a few added for good measure - looks to be a pretty good list

Billy Yang talks to Tim Tollefson and Zack Miller after there runs at UTMB

Some tips for avoiding hitting the wall but Jeff Galloway misses one great tip that has helped me in that area, that is to become fat adapted so as to use a much more plentiful energy source, fat, along with carbs.   SFuels has a "Quick Start Guide" for changing over to use fat

Speaking of fat adaptation, there are many issues with this article but bottom line is a single athlete having a bad race on a particular diet does not make the diet bad.  While they did give at least 21 weeks on a LCHF diet it can take 6 months or more for some people to switch over and as this athlete was a vegetarian and probably was very high on carbs it may take even longer.  Then there is the time it takes to dial in your carb intake as it can vary.  Bottom line this athlete may have had to go longer to see the results get better.  SFuels Triathlete Dr. Dan Plews does triathlons and is LCHF so it can be done just needs to be dialed in.

More LCHF news, Thanks to Dr. Mark Cucuzzella pointing me to the article by Dr. Georgia Ede: Latest Low-Carb Study: All Politics, No Science

Mike Wardian sets an FKT on the C&O Canal Towpath

A look at Geoffrey Kamworor

Do's and Don'ts of being a good pacer in an Ultra

I do not usually out triathlon news but when it is about Barkley finisher John Kelly I think it is worthy.  Here is his report on the 2018 Ironman Mont-Tremblant

OutsideOnline's look at Karel Sabbe's AT FKT


Masters Running News
Results of the Masters World Championships in Malaga Spain


Local, to Kentucky, Races and Events (In the future will also include races in nearby states)
(If you have a race in the area, including surrounding states, let me know and I will post about it)

Check out these Race Companies for local races: Good Times Even Services & Central Kentucky Race Management.  For trail and Ultra races in Kentucky and Virginia check out Next Opportunity Events

Want to do a road half - then how about the Lake Cumberland Half-Marathon in Bronston, KY - near Somerset - on September 8, 2018

If you want a shorter race maybe the Iron Horse 5k in New Haven, KY is for you, also on September 8th.  The race benefits the Thomas Nelson High School Cross Country Team as well as Girls on the Run Program.  

Want a night race then run the Light the Night 5K in Elizabethtown, KY on September 15th

Need a trail race at the beginning of November then maybe the Jefferson Memorial Forest Trail Hillbilly Half in Louisville KY is for you on November 3rd, 2018.  I have only run out in the area once but there are some great trails

The Second Annual Harrods Creek Trail Bash 5K/10K is November 18, 2018 in Prospect KY

Also, check out the inaugural Falls 100 - also has a Half-Marathon, Marathon and 50 miler as well as the 100.

Want to run a great race then put the 2019 Yamacraw 50k (also a 20K and 10K ) on your schedule.  The race is April 6, 2019 and registration opens October 1st, 2018.  Either set your own reminder or have Ultrasignup send you one as I would not be surprised if this race does not sell out real fast as word is getting out about it.


Races this Coming Week
Ultra Tour Monte Rosa, Monte Rosa, IT - September 5-8, 2018
Tahoe 200, Incline Village, CA - September 7-9, 2018
Wasatch Front 100, East Layton, UT - September 7, 2018
Ultra-Trail Harricana, La Malbaie, Quebec - September 7-9, 2018
IAU 100k World Championships, Zagreb, Croatia - September 8, 2018
Iron Horse 5K, New Haven, KY - September 8, 2018
The Hawk 50 and 100, Lawrence, KS - September 8, 2018
Lake Cumberland Half-Marathon, Bronston, KY - September 8, 2018
Great North Run (1/2 Marathon), Newcastle, UK - September 9, 2018


Past Weekend Race Results
UTMB, Chamonix, FR - August 31, 2018
Grand Tour of Skiddaw, Dalston, UK - September 1, 2018
Southeastern Trail Runner Podcast 12 Hour Challenge, Scottsville, KY - September 2, 2018
The Rut, Big Sky Resort, Montana  - September 2, 2018
Wildcat 50 and 100, Pensacola, FL - September 3, 2018
Mt. Baldy Run-To-The-Top, Mt. Baldy, CA - September 3, 2018


1997 USATF 5000m Championship


The Best of UTMB 2018


More UTMB Highlights


And even more UTMB Highlights


The Tahoe 200 is this weekend and here is the Official Trailer from 2017


Last week's Mtn Outhouse News that came out after I posted Weekly RunDown


How do you prepare for a marathon Eliud Kipchoge does 15 X 1000m






Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Interview Tuesday: Kentucky Runner Josh Elliot

Josh and Rachel Groves at the 2018 Mohican Trail 100 Finish
 I initially met Josh while running and we cross paths, or even run together for a short time, but had not really gotten to know Josh so was good to read his responses - enjoy and if you are interested needing coaching check out the services he offers at Compass Endurance Coaching.


Tell us a little about yourself not necessarily related to running: age, where born, education, area you live in, etc…..
I am 37 years old and currently live in Louisville, Kentucky.  I was born and raised in rural southwestern Indiana and moved to the Louisville area after graduating college.  I have lived in the area for about 12 years. 


What is your profession?
I have a BS Mechanical Engineering Technology degree from the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville.  I have been employed with Motor Coach Industries for 14 years.  We are one of North America’s largest motor coach bus manufacturers and aftermarket motor coach parts suppliers.  Currently I am the Product Lifecycle and Pricing Manager.  In short, I work with bus parts..... 


How did you start running and what prompted you to do so?
Going from a structured life of high school sports to a sedentary lifestyle in college took a toll on my health.  Through poor diet choices and lack of activity, I gained nearly 35 pounds in a little over a year. 

In 2001 I started my adult-life running chapter in an effort to transform into a healthier lifestyle.  It worked!  Over the course of 18 months, I lost 60 pounds and kept it off.  I continued to run for several years, but only for exercise, nothing too serious. 

In 2007 I ran my first half marathon – The Indianapolis 500 Festival.  It was a great accomplish for me to finish the distance and to share the experience with thousands of other runners.  This was the spark that took me from someone who enjoyed running for exercise and really ignited my passion for endurance sports and competition. 


How long have you been running?
Answered above.   Competitively, since 2006.


Did you participate in any other sports over the years?
I was heavily involved with go-kart racing from my childhood through my late 20’s.  It was a big part of my culture growing up in rural Indiana, the home of dirt track open wheel racing.  My dad and uncle raced karts and it was something that tied our family together. 

My running had progressed and I then started to get heavily involved in triathlon around 2010-2011, which led to focusing on the full Ironman distance.   I began to realize that I had too many hobbies that required too much time in order to be my best at each one.  I do not like to compromise with my competitive endeavors – If I cannot commit 100% to being the best I can, then well something has to give.  So I made the decision at that time to let go of kart racing and focus all my hobby energy and time on triathlon.  Traded my kart equipment for bike gear essentially….

I focused primarily on long-course triathlon between 2012 and 2015, finishing three full Ironman distance races and several half-iron events. 


2018 Backside Trail Marathon
Then…I found ultra running….  Kind of going full circle here, I realized I could not be the best I could be at ultra running if I was trying to be the best I could be at triathlon…..  So I made the decision to hang up the goggles and race bikes for a while to focus on running long.   This is where I still am today – focused on ultra running.   One day I will get back to triathlon, one day…


Did you run in grade school, High School or College?
Not really.  I mostly played stick and ball sports up through high school.  Football was my primary sport during high school.  I was an offensive guard and defensive linebacker if that tells you anything about my athletic build in school….


So we get an idea of where you have been with running can you share your PR’s for: 5K, 10K marathon and any other distance you may have run in the past:

  • 5k – 18:5X
  • Half Marathon – 1:27
  • Marathon – 3:12
  • 50 mile trail – 7:59
  • 100 mile trail – 25:30
  • Ironman 70.3 – 4:40
  • Ironman 140.6 – 11:02

What is your most memorable race or races and share a little about at least one of them?
This is a really hard question to answer….So many memorable races over the years for one reason or another.

Ironman Muncie 70.3 is my favorite triathlon, hands down.  It’s always brutally hot, the swim is calm, the bike is flat & fast, and the run is full of sun-exposed rolling hills.  I’ve just always shown up at Muncie in great shape and executed well every single year.   Any race you perform well at is typically a favorite, right?

From a running standpoint Louisville Lovin’ the Hills 50K always ranks high on my list.  The course is tough, the February timing is a brutal reality winter fitness check, the race directors are awesome, and it typically brings out the who’s who in the regional ultra scene. 

And I can’t live in Louisville without mentioning the Derby Half/Marathon.  Local favorite for sure.  I ran my first marathon at this event.  And also set my half marathon PR at this event.  So I guess it should hold a memorable spot on my list. 


Do you have a favorite workout you do?
Yes, I do have a couple key workouts that I enjoy and are good gauges of my fitness leading up to a key event. 

My favorite speed workout in general is intervals at threshold effort.  Like a 3 (sometimes 4) x 1 mile with short recovery.   And I’m always a fan of the ole staple half marathon pace effort run. 

For trail ultras, I really enjoy peak week workouts with long back to back time-on-feet doubles.  If I can cap off a big peak block with a big double on tired legs and feel good, then I know my body and head (most importantly) is in a good place.   


How about a favorite route you like to run?
Currently one of my favorite routes is the Red & Orange Trail loop at Jefferson Memorial Forest.  The 6ish mile loop has a little bit of everything…. From flat runnable sections, narrow single track, to three substantial climbs & downhills.  The loop totals about 800ft of gain and has access to water spigots each lap.   It is on my way home from work and I can stop in and do as little or as many laps as I want.  I enjoy it at JMF!


What is your favorite distance to run and race?
The half marathon is my favorite road race distance.  All things equal I feel I am most competitive at this distance versus a 5/10K or marathon distance.  Of course that has a lot to do with my physiology and how I structure my training. 

For trail and ultras, that’s a tougher question.  50K is my favorite trail distance to “race.”  It is long enough to tap into some ultra distance strategy, but also short enough you can kinda wing it if things go wrong. 


2017 Bernheim Forest half marathon
100 milers still have my interest from a participation standpoint.  I have completed three 100 milers and each one I have went through experiences and lessons only reachable in 100 mile runs for me.


What shoes do you run in and what do you like about them?
My go-to road trainers for the past couple years have been the Hoka Cliftons.   Lightweight and lots of cushion.  I am a big fan of the new wide models. 

My favorite trail shoes are the Superior and Lone Peaks from Altra.  Both are relatively light weight for what they are.  The low stack, zero drop, and most importantly for me the roomy foot shaped toe box is why.  They just fit me really well. 

Both Altra and Hoka are big supports of the trail/ultra scene, which I dig.  Support those who support you. 


Do you have any long-range plans?
My most important long-range plan is to continue to lead a healthy, outdoors, and active lifestyle for as long as possible. 

From a race standpoint I plan to run Western States 100 one day.  I plan to continue to fulfill the lottery requirements by completing a qualifying 100 mile race each year.

I will continue to grow my coaching knowledge base and deepen my roots in the community.  I plan to one day transform my passion for endurance sports and wellness into a full time career.

From an adventure standpoint, exploring the canyons, mountains, and desserts out West in the next few years is on the list.  And thru-hiking the AT has peaked my interests at times…We’ll have to see where my life journey takes me on that one… 


Can you share about your coaching services and what you do at Compass Endurance Coaching as well as the services you offer?
Our online programs, whether it is one-on-one coaching or a one-time personalized plan, are geared towards runners and triathletes who want to take their fitness and performance to the next level.   We work with all abilities, distances, and goals.  All we ask is that you’re committed to the process and keep the lines of communication between coach and athlete open.  No distance or event is too big or small.  We have worked with couch-to-5K programs all the way up to 100 mile runs and double-ironman triathlons.

There is no one-size fits all training program.  Goals, available time, work schedule, life events, etc., all factor into the design and maintenance of a successful training program.   Through our experience of advising athletes and self-coaching, we have developed techniques to effectively design training programs for time-crunched athletes.  More importantly, we have successful strategies to adjust programs when unexpected life events get in the way. 

Our number 1 goal is to get each athlete to the starting line healthy, fit, informed, and hungry to give it their 100%.

For more information about our services or about Coach Rachel or myself, please visit our website: Compass Endurance Coaching 


What led you to get into coaching?
I am the type of person who always needs to understand the “why and how” behind things.  I enjoy learning as much as I can about topics that are new to me and I am interested in.  So back when I started getting serious into running and triathlon I submerged myself into reading and learning all that I could about the sport and sciences.  I became the person that my friends and teammates came to for training and racing advice. 

The Compass Endurance Coaching business side of things just evolved from there.  I enjoy helping others and wanted a public platform to grow. 


What makes up the bulk of those you coach as far as demographics go?
The bulk of the athletes we partner with are normal every-day people who are juggling full time jobs, families, and other life commitments.  Their time to train is limited and we work together to build the best quality program for them to achieve their goals. 


As stated previously, we work with a variety of abilities and type of events.  From couch-to-5K programs, to finishing your first half marathon, to Boston qualifiers, to ultra distance runners & triathletes.   


What do you like best about living and running in KY?
Training run at Lake Tahoe 2017
The rolling hills, parks, and running community!  Louisville is a very active town.  Great park system, which is ever growing with addition of the Louisville Loop & Parklands.  Great hiking and trail running scene.  Within a few hours drive of the mountains.   And honestly, I like the heat and humidity..haha


What do you struggle with most with regards to running?
I have a hard time taking blocks of time off.  I am a firm believer in that everyone needs an “off season” to reset not only physically, but mentally.  We all need it, but as competitive people it is sometimes hard to embrace the downtime. 


What do you see as a trend in running?
I do not have any data (which drives me crazy as an engineer….haha), but from my perspective, trail running and the ultra scene is growing and certainly becoming more mainstream.  Trail and ultra races are, growing in attendance, selling out, gaining better financial sponsorship support, etc.   And there is an entire industry growing alongside supporting the trail movement. 

I see ultra running now trending like the road marathon or Ironman was years ago.  These distances used to be only for the fast, crazy people…then us normal recreational athletes started participating, the cut-off times increased, and eventually the marathon and Ironman were events where 2 groups of people, those there to “compete” and those there to “complete” could toe the line together. 

Ultra running is at that stage now.  It could be the more laid back culture of ultra running or just that trail runners are more cool, but trail and ultra races are getting packed full of all ranges of abilities.  This is a good thing for the longevity of the sport!  It makes me happy to see so many people enjoying the great races and trails we have around Kentucky.     
 

If you had one, well maybe two or three, things to say those that are running to encourage them what would it be?
I do have some encouraging things to say.  Well actually I am going to paraphrase what my Compass Endurance Coaching partner Rachel Groves would say.  Her and I compliment each other very well as coaches.  I am typically more data driven and analytical….She is typically more life-stress balance and psychologically focused.   The comments below are things she has said over the years which hit home with me. 

Running is intrinsic first and foremost. The quickest way to defeat yourself is to forget that. You can’t compare yourself to another person when you start running. Apples and oranges. You are not built the same way another runner is, you are not composed of the same material another runner is. Your lifestyle doesn’t shape you the way another runners does. Keep it internal.  Always remember that. Use outside support to encourage you, to motivate you- not to stack yourself up against.

 Don’t tie running to something negative. Your goal should be to make it your stress relief, your sense of peace, not a punishment for too many calories or laziness.  Make it enhance your life- not burden it.  Say “I get to run” not “I have to run.”

Look for life lessons in your running. For example- It will be hard more often than easy, and that’s okay. This is what builds character. The runs you struggle through make the effortless, carefree runs worth it. Embrace the moment. Look, listen and feel what’s going on within you and around you when you run. Appreciate it for what it is, not what it was in the past or what it should be. Seek out like-minded people that challenge you for the better. This doesn’t mean look for people that force you to keep up, it means look for people that build you up. Learn to let go of what’s holding you back and learn to welcome what’s pushing you forward. When you run, you need to keep your eyes forward so you can see what’s coming. All of these examples are much like life. Just keep progressing!


Do you have a website or other social media site you would like to share?